Modify Registry

Adversaries may interact with the Windows Registry to hide configuration information within Registry keys, remove information as part of cleaning up, or as part of other techniques to aid in Persistence and Execution.

Access to specific areas of the Registry depends on account permissions, some requiring administrator-level access. The built-in Windows command-line utility Reg may be used for local or remote Registry modification. [1] Other tools may also be used, such as a remote access tool, which may contain functionality to interact with the Registry through the Windows API (see examples).

Registry modifications may also include actions to hide keys, such as prepending key names with a null character, which will cause an error and/or be ignored when read via Reg or other utilities using the Win32 API. [2] Adversaries may abuse these pseudo-hidden keys to conceal payloads/commands used to establish Persistence. [3] [4]

The Registry of a remote system may be modified to aid in execution of files as part of Lateral Movement. It requires the remote Registry service to be running on the target system. [5] Often Valid Accounts are required, along with access to the remote system's Windows Admin Shares for RPC communication.

ID: T1112

Tactic: Defense Evasion

Platform:  Windows

Permissions Required:  User, Administrator, SYSTEM

Data Sources:  Windows Registry, File monitoring, Process monitoring, Process command-line parameters, Windows event logs

Defense Bypassed:  Host forensic analysis

Contributors:  Bartosz Jerzman; Travis Smith, Tripwire; David Lu, Tripwire
Version: 1.0

Mitigations

Mitigation Description
Restrict Registry Permissions Ensure proper permissions are set for Registry hives to prevent users from modifying keys for system components that may lead to privilege escalation.

Examples

Name Description
ADVSTORESHELL

ADVSTORESHELL is capable of setting and deleting Registry values.[6]

APT19

APT19 uses a Port 22 malware variant to modify several Registry keys.[7]

APT32

APT32's backdoor has modified the Windows Registry to store the backdoor's configuration.

[8]

APT38

APT38 uses a tool called CLEANTOAD that has the capability to modify Registry keys.[9]

BACKSPACE

BACKSPACE is capable of deleting Registry keys, sub-keys, and values on a victim system.[10]

BADCALL

BADCALL modifies the firewall Registry key SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\SharedAccess\Parameters\FirewallPolicy\StandardProfileGloballyOpenPorts\List.[11]

Bankshot

Bankshot writes data into the Registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Pniumj.[12]

Cardinal RAT

Cardinal RAT sets HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows\Load to point to its executable.[13]

Catchamas

Catchamas creates three Registry keys to establish persistence by adding a New Service.[14]

CHOPSTICK

CHOPSTICK may store RC4 encrypted configuration information in the Windows Registry.[15]

DarkComet

DarkComet adds a Registry value for its installation routine to the Registry Key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System Enable LUA="0" and HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\DC3_FEXEC.[16][17]

Dragonfly 2.0

Dragonfly 2.0 modified the Registry to perform multiple techniques through the use of Reg.[18]

Exaramel

Exaramel adds the configuration to the Registry in XML format.[19]

FELIXROOT

FELIXROOT deletes the Registry key HKCU\Software\Classes\Applications\rundll32.exe\shell\open.[20]

FIN8

FIN8 has deleted Registry keys during post compromise cleanup activities.[21]

Gorgon Group

Gorgon Group malware can deactivate security mechanisms in Microsoft Office by editing several keys and values under HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Office\.[22]

GreyEnergy

GreyEnergy modifies conditions in the Registry and adds keys.[23]

Honeybee

Honeybee uses a batch file that modifies Registry keys to launch a DLL into the svchost.exe process.[24]

HOPLIGHT

HOPLIGHT has modified Managed Object Format (MOF) files within the Registry to run specific commands and create persistence on the system. [25]

Hydraq

Hydraq creates a Registry subkey to register its created service, and can also uninstall itself later by deleting this value. Hydraq's backdoor also enables remote attackers to modify and delete subkeys.[26][27]

InvisiMole

InvisiMole has a command to create, set, copy, or delete a specified Registry key or value.[28]

KEYMARBLE

KEYMARBLE has a command to create Registry entries for storing data under HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WABE\DataPath.[29]

LoJax

LoJax has modified the Registry key ‘HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\BootExecute’ from ‘autocheck autochk to ‘autocheck autoche .[30]

Mosquito

Mosquito stores configuration values under the Registry key HKCU\Software\Microsoft[dllname] and modifies Registry keys under HKCR\CLSID...\InprocServer32with a path to the launcher.[31]

Naid

Naid creates Registry entries that store information about a created service and point to a malicious DLL dropped to disk.[32]

NanoCore

NanoCore has the capability to edit the Registry.[33][34]

Nerex

Nerex creates a Registry subkey that registers a new service.[35]

njRAT

njRAT can create, delete, or modify a specified Registry key or value.[36][37]

Patchwork

A Patchwork payload deletes Resiliency Registry keys created by Microsoft Office applications in an apparent effort to trick users into thinking there were no issues during application runs.[38]

PHOREAL

PHOREAL is capable of manipulating the Registry.[39]

PLAINTEE

PLAINTEE uses reg add to add a Registry Run key for persistence.[40]

PlugX

PlugX has a module to create, delete, or modify Registry keys.[41]

PoisonIvy

PoisonIvy creates a Registry subkey that registers a new system device.[42]

QUADAGENT

QUADAGENT modifies an HKCU Registry key to store a session identifier unique to the compromised system as well as a pre-shared key used for encrypting and decrypting C2 communications.[43]

QuasarRAT

QuasarRAT has a command to edit the Registry on the victim’s machine.[44]

Reg

Reg may be used to interact with and modify the Windows Registry of a local or remote system at the command-line interface.[1]

Regin

Regin appears to have functionality to modify remote Registry information.[45]

Remcos

Remcos has full control of the Registry, including the ability to modify it.[46]

Rover

Rover has functionality to remove Registry Run key persistence as a cleanup procedure.[47]

RTM

RTM can delete all Registry entries created during its execution.[48]

Shamoon

Once Shamoon has access to a network share, it enables the RemoteRegistry service on the target system. It will then connect to the system with RegConnectRegistryW and modify the Registry to disable UAC remote restrictions by setting SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System\LocalAccountTokenFilterPolicy to 1.[49][50]

SOUNDBITE

SOUNDBITE is capable of modifying the Registry.[39]

StreamEx

StreamEx has the ability to modify the Registry.[51]

SynAck

SynAck can manipulate Registry keys.[52]

Threat Group-3390

A Threat Group-3390 tool can create a new Registry key under HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\.[53]

TrickBot

TrickBot can modify registry entries.[54]

Turla

Turla has used the Registry to store encrypted payloads.[55][56]

TYPEFRAME

TYPEFRAME can install encrypted configuration data under the Registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\ShellCompatibility\Applications\laxhost.dll and HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\PrintConfigs.[57]

Ursnif

Ursnif has used Registry modifications as part of its installation routine.[58][59]

Volgmer

Volgmer stores the encoded configuration file in the Registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentContorlSet\Control\WMI\Security.[60][61]

Zeus Panda

Zeus Panda modifies several Registry keys under HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\ PhishingFilter\ to disable phishing filters.[62]

zwShell

zwShell can modify the Registry.[63]

Detection

Modifications to the Registry are normal and occur throughout typical use of the Windows operating system. Consider enabling Registry Auditing on specific keys to produce an alertable event (Event ID 4657) whenever a value is changed (though this may not trigger when values are created with Reghide or other evasive methods). [64] Changes to Registry entries that load software on Windows startup that do not correlate with known software, patch cycles, etc., are suspicious, as are additions or changes to files within the startup folder. Changes could also include new services and modification of existing binary paths to point to malicious files. If a change to a service-related entry occurs, then it will likely be followed by a local or remote service start or restart to execute the file.

Monitor processes and command-line arguments for actions that could be taken to change or delete information in the Registry. Remote access tools with built-in features may interact directly with the Windows API to gather information. Information may also be acquired through Windows system management tools such as Windows Management Instrumentation and PowerShell, which may require additional logging features to be configured in the operating system to collect necessary information for analysis.

Monitor for processes, command-line arguments, and API calls associated with concealing Registry keys, such as Reghide. [2] Inspect and cleanup malicious hidden Registry entries using Native Windows API calls and/or tools such as Autoruns [4] and RegDelNull [65].

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