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Screen Capture

Adversaries may attempt to take screen captures of the desktop to gather information over the course of an operation. Screen capturing functionality may be included as a feature of a remote access tool used in post-compromise operations.

Mac

On OSX, the native command screencapture is used to capture screenshots.

Linux

On Linux, there is the native command xwd. [1]

ID: T1113

Tactic: Collection

Platform:  Linux, macOS, Windows

Data Sources:  API monitoring, Process monitoring, File monitoring

Version: 1.0

Examples

NameDescription
APT28

APT28 has used tools to take screenshots from victims.[2][3][4]

BADNEWS

BADNEWS has a command to take a screenshot and send it to the C2 server.[5][6]

Bandook

Bandook is capable of taking an image of and uploading the current desktop.[7]

BlackEnergy

BlackEnergy is capable of taking screenshots.[8]

BRONZE BUTLER

BRONZE BUTLER has used a tool to capture screenshots.[9]

Carbanak

Carbanak performs desktop video recording and captures screenshots of the desktop and sends it to the C2 server.[10]

Catchamas

Catchamas captures screenshots based on specific keywords in the window’s title.[11]

CHOPSTICK

CHOPSTICK has the capability to capture screenshots.[4]

Cobalt Strike

Cobalt Strike's "beacon" payload is capable of capturing screen shots.[12]

CosmicDuke

CosmicDuke takes periodic screenshots and exfiltrates them.[13]

Crimson

Crimson contains a command to perform screen captures.[14]

CrossRAT

CrossRAT is capable of taking screen captures.[7]

Dark Caracal

Dark Caracal took screen shots using their Windows malware.[7]

Daserf

Daserf can take screenshots.[15][9]

Derusbi

Derusbi is capable of performing screen captures.[16]

DOGCALL

DOGCALL is capable of capturing screenshots.[17]

Dragonfly 2.0

Dragonfly 2.0 has performed screen captures of victims, including by using a tool, scr.exe (which matched the hash of ScreenUtil).[18][19]

EvilGrab

EvilGrab has the capability to capture screenshots.[20]

FIN7

FIN7 captured screenshots and desktop video recordings.[21]

FinFisher

FinFisher takes a screenshot of the screen and displays it on top of all other windows for few seconds in an apparent attempt to hide some messages showed by the system during the setup process.[22][23]

Flame

Flame can take regular screenshots when certain applications are open that are sent to the command and control server.[24]

FruitFly

FruitFly takes screenshots of the user's desktop.[25]

Group5

Malware used by Group5 is capable of watching the victim's screen.[26]

HALFBAKED

HALFBAKED can obtain screenshots from the victim.[27]

Hydraq

Hydraq includes a component based on the code of VNC that can stream a live feed of the desktop of an infected host.[28]

InvisiMole

InvisiMole can capture screenshots of not only the entire screen, but of each separate window open, in case they are overlapping.[29]

Janicab

Janicab captured screenshots and sent them out to a C2 server.[30][31]

JHUHUGIT

A JHUHUGIT variant takes screenshots by simulating the user pressing the "Take Screenshot" key (VK_SCREENSHOT), accessing the screenshot saved in the clipboard, and converting it to a JPG image.[32]

jRAT

jRAT has the capability to take screenshots of the victim’s machine.[33]

Kasidet

Kasidet has the ability to initiate keylogging and screen captures.[34]

Kazuar

Kazuar captures screenshots of the victim’s screen.[35]

KEYMARBLE

KEYMARBLE can capture screenshots of the victim’s machine.[36]

MacSpy

MacSpy can capture screenshots of the desktop over multiple monitors.[25]

Magic Hound

Magic Hound malware can take a screenshot and upload the file to its C2 server.[37]

Matroyshka

Matroyshka is capable of performing screen captures.[38][39]

NETWIRE

NETWIRE can capture the victim's screen.[40]

OilRig

OilRig has a tool called CANDYKING to capture a screenshot of user's desktop.[41]

POORAIM

POORAIM can perform screen capturing.[17]

PowerSploit

PowerSploit's Get-TimedScreenshot Exfiltration module can take screenshots at regular intervals.[42][43]

POWERSTATS

POWERSTATS can retrieve screenshots from compromised hosts.[44]

POWRUNER

POWRUNER can capture a screenshot from a victim.[45]

Prikormka

Prikormka contains a module that captures screenshots of the victim's desktop.[46]

Proton

Proton captures the content of the desktop with the screencapture binary.[25]

Pteranodon

Pteranodon can capture screenshots at a configurable interval.[47]

Pupy

Pupy can drop a mouse-logger that will take small screenshots around at each click and then send back to the server.[48]

RedLeaves

RedLeaves can capture screenshots.[49][50]

RogueRobin

RogueRobin has a command named $screenshot that may be responsible for taking screenshots of the victim machine.[51]

ROKRAT

ROKRAT captures screenshots of the infected system.[52][53]

Rover

Rover takes screenshots of the compromised system's desktop and saves them to C:\system\screenshot.bmp for exfiltration every 60 minutes.[54]

RTM

RTM can capture screenshots.[55]

SHUTTERSPEED

SHUTTERSPEED can capture screenshots.[17]

Socksbot

Socksbot can take screenshots.[56]

T9000

T9000 can take screenshots of the desktop and target application windows, saving them to user directories as one byte XOR encrypted .dat files.[57]

TinyZBot

TinyZBot contains screen capture functionality.[58]

Trojan.Karagany

Trojan.Karagany can take a desktop screenshot and save the file into \ProgramData\Mail\MailAg\shot.png.[59]

TURNEDUP

TURNEDUP is capable of taking screenshots.[60]

UPPERCUT

UPPERCUT can capture desktop screenshots in the PNG format and send them to the C2 server.[61]

VERMIN

VERMIN can perform screen captures of the victim’s machine.[62]

XAgentOSX

XAgentOSX contains the takeScreenShot (along with startTakeScreenShot and stopTakeScreenShot) functions to take screenshots using the CGGetActiveDisplayList, CGDisplayCreateImage, and NSImage:initWithCGImage methods.[3]

yty

yty collects screenshots of the victim machine.[63]

ZLib

ZLib has the ability to obtain screenshots of the compromised system.[64]

Mitigation

Blocking software based on screen capture functionality may be difficult, and there may be legitimate software that performs those actions. Instead, identify potentially malicious software that may have functionality to acquire screen captures, and audit and/or block it by using whitelisting [65] tools, like AppLocker, [66] [67] or Software Restriction Policies [68] where appropriate. [69]

Detection

Monitoring for screen capture behavior will depend on the method used to obtain data from the operating system and write output files. Detection methods could include collecting information from unusual processes using API calls used to obtain image data, and monitoring for image files written to disk. The sensor data may need to be correlated with other events to identify malicious activity, depending on the legitimacy of this behavior within a given network environment.

References

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