Password Policies

Set and enforce secure password policies for accounts.

ID: M1027
Version: 1.0
Created: 06 June 2019
Last Modified: 06 June 2019

Techniques Addressed by Mitigation

Domain ID Name Use
Enterprise T1110 Brute Force

Refer to NIST guidelines when creating password policies.[1]

.001 Password Guessing

Refer to NIST guidelines when creating password policies. [1]

.002 Password Cracking

Refer to NIST guidelines when creating password policies. [1]

.003 Password Spraying

Refer to NIST guidelines when creating password policies. [1]

.004 Credential Stuffing

Refer to NIST guidelines when creating password policies. [1]

Enterprise T1555 Credentials from Password Stores

The password for the user's login keychain can be changed from the user's login password. This increases the complexity for an adversary because they need to know an additional password.

Organizations may consider weighing the risk of storing credentials in password stores and web browsers. If system, software, or web browser credential disclosure is a significant concern, technical controls, policy, and user training may be used to prevent storage of credentials in improper locations.

.001 Keychain

The password for the user's login keychain can be changed from the user's login password. This increases the complexity for an adversary because they need to know an additional password.

.003 Credentials from Web Browsers

Organizations may consider weighing the risk of storing credentials in web browsers. If web browser credential disclosure is a significant concern, technical controls, policy, and user training may be used to prevent storage of credentials in web browsers.

Enterprise T1187 Forced Authentication

Use strong passwords to increase the difficulty of credential hashes from being cracked if they are obtained.

Enterprise T1003 OS Credential Dumping

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.006 DCSync

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.001 LSASS Memory

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.002 Security Account Manager

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.007 Proc Filesystem

Ensure that root accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.008 /etc/passwd and /etc/shadow

Ensure that root accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.005 Cached Domain Credentials

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.004 LSA Secrets

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.003 NTDS

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

Enterprise T1201 Password Policy Discovery

Ensure only valid password filters are registered. Filter DLLs must be present in Windows installation directory (C:\Windows\System32\ by default) of a domain controller and/or local computer with a corresponding entry in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Notification Packages. [3]

Enterprise T1563 .001 Remote Service Session Hijacking: SSH Hijacking

Ensure SSH key pairs have strong passwords and refrain from using key-store technologies such as ssh-agent unless they are properly protected.

Enterprise T1021 .002 Remote Services: SMB/Windows Admin Shares

Do not reuse local administrator account passwords across systems. Ensure password complexity and uniqueness such that the passwords cannot be cracked or guessed.

Enterprise T1072 Software Deployment Tools

Verify that account credentials that may be used to access deployment systems are unique and not used throughout the enterprise network.

Enterprise T1558 Steal or Forge Kerberos Tickets

Ensure strong password length (ideally 25+ characters) and complexity for service accounts and that these passwords periodically expire.[4] Also consider using Group Managed Service Accounts or another third party product such as password vaulting.[4]

.002 Silver Ticket

Ensure strong password length (ideally 25+ characters) and complexity for service accounts and that these passwords periodically expire.[4] Also consider using Group Managed Service Accounts or another third party product such as password vaulting.[4]

.003 Kerberoasting

Ensure strong password length (ideally 25+ characters) and complexity for service accounts and that these passwords periodically expire.[4] Also consider using Group Managed Service Accounts or another third party product such as password vaulting.[4]

Enterprise T1537 Transfer Data to Cloud Account

Consider rotating access keys within a certain number of days to reduce the effectiveness of stolen credentials.

Enterprise T1552 Unsecured Credentials

Use strong passphrases for private keys to make cracking difficult. Do not store credentials within the Registry. Establish an organizational policy that prohibits password storage in files.

.001 Credentials In Files

Establish an organizational policy that prohibits password storage in files.

.002 Credentials in Registry

Do not store credentials within the Registry.

.004 Private Keys

Use strong passphrases for private keys to make cracking difficult.

Enterprise T1550 .003 Use Alternate Authentication Material: Pass the Ticket

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords.

Enterprise T1078 Valid Accounts

Applications and appliances that utilize default username and password should be changed immediately after the installation, and before deployment to a production environment. [2] When possible, applications that use SSH keys should be updated periodically and properly secured.

.003 Local Accounts

Ensure that local administrator accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.004 Cloud Accounts

Ensure that privileged cloud accounts have complex, unique passwords across all systems on the network.

.001 Default Accounts

Applications and appliances that utilize default username and password should be changed immediately after the installation, and before deployment to a production environment. [2]

References